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It’s the Year of the Nurse, but why does it matter? Hear what your peers are saying.

Nurses discuss the importance of this year’s celebration, what they love about their jobs and their thoughts on the future of the profession.

Nurses get an extra dose of appreciation this year, with 2020 designated by the World Health Organization as the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife.1 It’s no coincidence that 2020 also marks the 200th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birth, presenting the perfect opportunity to praise nurses.

Along with the well-deserved recognition, the Year of the Nurse campaign also incorporates critical long-term goals: to provide worldwide quality healthcare for all and to prevent the next decade’s predicted nurse shortage.2 But those are stories for another day. Here, we focus on celebrating nurses and nursing, represented through the voices of Medline post-acute and acute care clinicians.

Why is it important to celebrate nurses?

Kristin White

“When you recognize nurses and the importance of nursing, it brings a renewed commitment as a nurse and pride in your work.”
Kristin White, RN, BSN, CWON

Ronald Krinn

“It’s important to recognize nursing’s place in the spectrum of care to add validity and credibility to the work we perform.”
Ronald Krinn, BSN, BA, RN, CWOCN

Soroush Arjomand

“Nurses work hard to provide care and comfort to their patients in what is often the hardest time of that patient’s life. These selfless efforts are often underappreciated.”
Soroush Arjomand, RN, BSN

Kim Kehoe

Nurses around the globe answer the call to service of others, making a difference every day through the hands, the heart and the skills of the healer.”
Kim Kehoe, BSN, RN, CWOCN, DAPWCA

Katie James

“At the end of the day, we are the best patient advocates out there; we are there to fight for the patient when the patient can’t fight for themselves.”
Katie James, BA, RN, CWCN

Patty Turner

“We bridge that gap between the science of medicine and the art and the caring of medicine.”
Patty Turner, BSN, RN, CWOCN, CWS

What do you love about being a nurse?

Dawn Fortna

“Caring for patients and their loved ones and educating them during any healthcare situation.”
Dawn Fortna, MSEd, RN, CDE, CWOCN

Kalia Martin

“Having the opportunity to make an impact in someone else’s life.”
Kaila Martin, MSN, RN

Kim Kehoe

“Nurses around the globe answer the call to service of others, making a difference every day through the hands, the heart and the skills of the healer.”
Kim Kehoe, BSN, RN, CWOCN, DAPWCA

Doreen Gendreau

“The ability to bring the fabric of who I am as a human being and combine that with innovation, technology and education.”
Doreen Gendreau, EdD, MSN, MS, RN-BC

Patty Turner

“The randomness of making a difference in a person’s life; you don’t know their history or their family and yet you become such an important part of their life and their wellness.”
Patty Turner, BSN, RN, CWOCN, CWS

What do you look forward to in the future of nursing?

Ronald Krinn

“I am hopeful that the education platform continues to revolve around traditional practices of care and learning, and not focused solely with online training. Nursing is a people to people set of skills, not a people to computer set of skills.”
Ronald Krinn, BSN, BA, RN, CWOCN

Kim Kehoe

“I’d like to see academia offer an entrepreneurship course offering as an elective in the baccalaureate programs, because nurses need to understand the business side of the healthcare profession.”
Kim Kehoe, BSN, RN, CWOCN, DAPWCA

Patty Turner

“I look forward to seeing how the profession can grow, but I do worry that if there’s too much focus on advancement and advanced degrees, who’s left at the bedside?”
Patty Turner, BSN, RN, CWOCN, CWS

Doreen Gendreau

“I think it’s important to recognize that nurses are going to become more technologically advanced as the coming years evolve, but not to lose the heart of nursing.”
Doreen Gendreau, EdD, MSN, MS, RN-BC

For skin health-focused articles, download a copy of the latest Healthy Skin magazine. If you know of a nurse or other healthcare worker who deserves a special shout-out, check out Medline’s Works of Heart program.

Doreen Gendreau, Soroush Arjomand, Katie James, Kristin White, Kim Kehoe are Medline Clinical Nurses. Ronald Krinn, Dawn Fortna, Kaila Martin are Medline Clinical Nurse Educators. Patty Turner is the Medline Director of Clinical Services.

References:

  1. World Health Organization, “2020-Year of the Nurse and the Midwife.” Accessed January 13, 2020
  2. International Council of Nurses, “WHO Chief Nursing Officer calls for recruitment drive for Year of the Nurse 2020.” Accessed January 13, 2020