PRODUCT GUIDANCE

Get to know the dangers
of bed entrapment.

Bed Safety

Bedside safety products for long-term
care facilities

A bed is a resident’s safe place, but when mattresses, bed rails or grab bars do not fit properly, problems can arise. Deaths and injuries from entrapment result when the resident slips between the mattress and side rail or gets trapped within the side rail itself. The risk of entrapment increases when there are large gaps or openings in the bed system that could entrap a resident’s neck, head or chest.

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Risk factors

Gaps can be caused by mattresses that aren’t the recommended size, loose side rails or design elements such as wide spaces between the openings in the rails.

Who is at risk?

Older or frail adults and those who have conditions such as agitation, delirium, confusion, pain, uncontrolled body movement, hypoxia, fecal impaction or acute urinary retention. These conditions make them likely to move about in the bed or try to get out of it.1

Do you know the zones of entrapment?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has identified Seven Zones of Entrapment to alert caregivers to the possible hazards related to these areas of a healthcare bed.1,2,3. Click on the zones tabs to see the possible hazards with your beds and learn about products to help avoid injury.

Entrapment Zones

Within the Rail1

Any open space between the perimeters of the rail can present a risk of head entrapment. FDA recommended space: less than 4 3/4″

Recommended Product

Bed Side Safety - zone 1

Halo Safety Ring Circular Side Rails

Help reduce entrapment concerns and allow for easy exit points for the neck, head and chest.

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Under the Rail, Between the Rail Supports or Next to the Single Rail Support1

The gap under the rail between the mattress may allow for dangerous head entrapment. FDA recommended space: less than 4 3/4″

Recommended Product

Bed Side Safety - zone 2

Bed Wedge Gap Guards

Protect residents from contact with the bed rail and possible slipping between the rail and the mattress.

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Between the Rail and the Mattress1

This area is the space between the inside surface of the bed rail and the mattress. and if too big, can cause a risk of head entrapment. FDA recommended: less than 4 3/4″

Recommended Product

Bed Side Safety - zone 3

Mattress Extenders

Place between the mattress and side rail to reduce dangerous gaps.

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Under the Rail at the Ends of the Rail1

A gap between the mattress and the lowermost portion of the rail poses a risk of neck entrapment. FDA recommended space: less than 2 3/4″

Recommended Product

Bed Side Safety - zone 3

Side Rail Pads

Provide cushioning and protection. Soft high-density foam pads have easy- to-clean Nylex covers.

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Between Split Bed Rails

When partial length head and split rails are used on the same side of the bed, the space between the rails may present a risk of either neck or chest entrapment.

Recommended Product

Bed Side Safety - zone 3

Bed Wedge Gap Guards

Protect residents from contact with the bed rail and possible slipping between the rail and the mattress.

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Between the End of the Rail and the Side Edge of the Head or Foot Board 3

A gap between the end of the bed rail and the side of the edge of the headboard or footboard can present a risk of entrapment.

Recommended Product

Bed Side Safety - zone 3

Advantage Gap Sleeves

Features three therapeutic layers and premium “all-way” stretch cover that allows the foam to conform to the patient.

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Between the Head or Foot Board and the End of the Mattress3

When there is too large of a space between the inside surface of the headboard or footboard and the end of the mattress, the risk of head entrapment increases.

Recommended Product

Bed Side Safety - zone 3

Foam Mattress Extenders

Place between the mattress and footboard and mattress and side rail to reduce dangerous gaps.

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References:

  1. Food and Drug Administration. Practice hospital bed safety. Available at: http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm164366.htm. Accessed September 16, 2015.
  2. Nixon R. Consumer agency finds most adult bedrail deaths are among those 60 and older. The New York Times. November 29, 2012. Available at: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/30/us/consumer-safety-agency-studies-adult-bedrail-deaths.html?smid=pl-share&_r=0. Accessed September 16, 2015.
  3. Todd JT. Food and Drug Administration. Medical devices: Waking up to hospital bed entrapment risks. Available at: http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/Safety/AlertsandNotices/TipsandArticlesonDeviceSafety/ucm064614.htm. Accessed September 18, 2015.

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